Homemade Beeswax Candles

Homemade beeswax candles are a great non-toxic alternative to their store-bought counterparts. These are an easy way to add a cozy ambience and contribute to a healthier home.

Three small beeswax candles with a lit wick

I Was Sick for 6 Months

Several years ago I caught some sort or respiratory virus that was going around. No big deal, it happens a lot when you work with the public, right? Wrong. It turned out to be a very big deal, and one of the hardest things I have ever gone through. I was sick for over 6 months, and I mean flat on my back, not able to go to work, sleeping propped up on the couch sick.

After seeing multiple doctors, one finally figured out that the virus had triggered my asthma and I had essentially been having an asthma attack for 6 months. He adjusted my meds and thankfully I started to heal. This experience made me really aware of the importance of my respiratory health and had me making several swaps with my every day products.

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I started doing some research and I was SHOCKED to discover that the air quality in most homes is 2 to 5 times worse than the air outdoors. Burning traditional, store-bought candles can be a big contributor to poor indoor air quality. Paraffin candles can emit toxic chemicals like benzene, toluene, and formaldehyde. Even the American Lung Association says burning candles is bad for asthmatics and those with lung sensitivity!

Candle Alternatives

I loved burning scented candles in my home, but I knew my health was more important. I tried some alternatives, like diffusing essential oils. This is a great way to infuse healthy fragrance into the home, but I missed the coziness of a flickering candle. While it was one good tool in my arsenal, it did not truly replace candles for me.

Another method I tried was simmering things like cinnamon sticks, orange peels, and cloves in a pot on the stove. This smells amazing, but I did not care for the idea of leaving a burner on, and it dried out too quickly when placed on the wood stove. Again, a worthy option but not a true candle-killer.

Homemade Beeswax Candles

3 small beeswax candles sitting on a white table in a dark room in front of a pitcher of flowers

In my research I discovered that you can make non-toxic candles from scratch! When burned, beeswax produces negative ions that can attach to unhealthy air particles, making them too heavy to inhale so they simply drop to the ground. Not only does beeswax not actively produce toxic fumes like traditional candles, it actually acts as a natural air purifier! I remembered making candles as a child, so I was excited to try these!

What Supplies Do I Need for Beeswax Candles?

A container of choice, pure beeswax, wicks, wick stickers for stability during pouring, and a pouring pot are all you need to get started. I sourced these materials from Amazon, but I would love to find a local beekeeper to supply me with beeswax.

supplies for making beeswax candles like a pot, wicks, and beeswax

There isn't an exact recipe to this. How much beeswax you use will depend mostly on the size of your containers. 1 lb of beeswax made 5 candles poured into jelly/spice-sized mason jars for me.

empty jars with wicks attached

The first time I made these I tried to do it as cheaply as possible, so I skipped the wick stickers and pouring pot. I REALLY recommend going ahead and investing in these extra things, especially if you think you will make these more than once. The wick stickers help the wick stay in place and not tip over while pouring the wax. The pouring pot makes it much easier to pour the wax into the containers, and also keeps you from ruining one of your other containers.

a spoon of beeswax pellets waiting to be dumped into a pitcher

How to Make Beeswax Candles

Start by melting the beeswax double-boiler style. Place the pouring pot (or bowl, or whatever you are using) in a saucepan of water and bring it slowly up to heat until the wax starts melting.  I used a regular wooden spoon to stir. I just wipe it with a paper towel while the wax is still hot. It actually conditioned and sealed my spoon nicely!

When the beeswax is melted, add 1 part coconut oil to 4 parts beeswax. This step is optional, but will help the candles burn a little smoother and with less soot.

If you want to add essential oils or any other fragrance, wait until the wax is off the heat, right before you pour.

Add wicks and stickers to containers, then pour wax.

Use stabilizers, or even pen clips, to stabilize the wicks and keep them straight up and down.

Let the candles cool until the wax is solidified.

freshly poured candles with pens propped up to keep the wicks straight

What Do I Need to Make Beeswax Candles?

1 lb of natural beeswax pellets

Assortment of small mason jars

Natural wicks

Wick stickers

Pouring Pot or heat safe container

1/2 C coconut oil

wooden spoon or other utensil to stir

a few pens to stabilize wicks

Tips for Making Beeswax Candles

•If you don't want to use the coconut oil, just omit it.

• Allow the candles to set up for a day or two, then snip the wick down to 1/4" before burning.

•When using for the first time allow the candle to burn til the entire top is melted. This way the candle won't "tunnel," which means just burning a small hole in the middle with a bunch of unused wax around the edges. Don't worry if this happens though, you can just reuse the wax for your next batch of candles.

•Beeswax is hard and burns hotter, so typically needs a larger wick than a paraffin candle of the same size. My smaller containers burned more smoothly with these wicks than the shorter, wider ones, so if you have wide-diameter jars you may want a heavier wick. Don't let this scare you off. I randomly ordered the medium wicks and they were just fine for my candles. If you wanted to try something different, you could use wood wicks.

I am so pleased with how my candles turned out, and am loving being able to enjoy candlelight again. I have a few burning beside me as we speak and I smell not smoke or soot, only the soft honey of the beeswax. It's so simple and easy to make these clean-burning candles, I hope you whip up your own batch!

3 beeswax candles on a white table that are burning

Homemade Beeswax Candles

Melissa from The Simply Creative Life
Homemade beeswax candles are an easy way to add coziness to your home without toxic fumes, so here is an easy tutorial!
5 from 1 vote
Servings 5 candles

Equipment

  • 1 Pouring Pot of heat resistant container
  • Assortment of small mason jars
  • Natural Wicks
  • Wick Stickers
  • Wooden Spoon
  • Stabilizers or Pens to stabilize wicks

Ingredients  

  • 1 lb natural beeswax can be solid or pellets
  • 1/2 C Coconut oil (optional)

Instructions 

  • Start by melting the beeswax double-boiler style. Place the pouring pot (or bowl, or whatever you are using) in a saucepan of water and bring it slowly up to heat until the wax starts melting.  I used a regular wooden spoon to stir. I just wipe it with a paper towel while the wax is still hot. It actually conditioned and sealed my spoon nicely!
  • When the beeswax is melted, add 1 part coconut oil to 4 parts beeswax. This step is optional, but will help the candles burn a little smoother and with less soot.
  • If you want to add essential oils or any other fragrance, wait until the wax is off the heat, right before you pour.
  • Add wicks and stickers to containers, then pour wax.
  • Use stabilizers, or even pen clips, to stabilize the wicks and keep them straight up and down.
  • Let the candles cool until the wax is solidified.
  • Trim wicks to 1/4", light, and enjoy!

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Recipe Rating




4 comments

  • Dani says:

    5 stars
    Great recipe!

    Reply
  • Anna says:

    Thanks for this great and simple how to. I have missed candles in my life and will be trying this.

    Reply